Sustainability Blog

Ariel Marcovich's picture
COP22 From Bed

The Conference of the Parts is the most important event in the world. Most high-level strategies and decisions on our planet's climate.
Do not worry there are ways to follow everything happening in Marrakech from bed!

These are some of the best resources we've found: 

  • Earth Negotiation Bulletin (ENB)
    A daily internet news publication covering every negotiations, workshops and conferences. 
    Check out their twitter, they could be the most active account out there. 
    @enbclimate
  • UNFCCC Side Events Streaming
    COP is the one of the biggest knowledge consentrators, generating amazing side events all the time on a widerange of topics and perspectives. UNFCCC is uploading and streamingMost Conferences for you to watch when ever you can. 
     
  • How COP looks and feels like?
    Finally if you want to get a glimpse of the experience, do not miss out on the daily Instagram Stories being uploaded to this account.
    @ ses.2017

 

Some other things you must follow are:

Newsletters

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Ivan Romero's picture
High-level Week: COP 22 is On

The most important threat to human kind has 1 week a year the spotlight. In 2016 the 134 countries in the Paris Agreement meet at Marraketch to celebrate that the biggest international agreement ever signed entered into force the past 4rd of November. This meeting like every year is the time to make desertions on how economy, culture, education and policy have to chango in order to have a bright future for human kind. Climate Change might represent an issue for the century, but also represents the unity of the world to achieve a sustainable future for all. It is an obstacle that is making businesses, academics, diplomats, indigenous people, and everyone open to a dialogue and look for common ground. So, today the High-level week of COP starts in beautiful and interesting city as a host of the event they are looking to keep the momentum of last year´s great agreement. I only hope the party keeps going despite the uncertain future, i hope we are better than this.

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Daniela Eichelmann's picture
COP22: End of week 1

                                                                                                                                             It is my first time at a COP and it has been surprising, moving, inspiring but most of all overwhelming. There are so many people from so many countries gathered in one same place working over one common interest, fighting Climate Change.
It has taken me by surprise the amount of young people, like myself, that are involved here at COP 22. I am sure that the next international leaders are being forged within this venue.
Although we have not access to most of the negotiation sessions word is out that parties are ready for next week, when the real happening begins. 

Here is a quick recap of this week’s most important news:

 

       - Good news: parties seem to be negotiating with a good spirit.

- Not so good news: Some countries and groups are delaying the negotiation sessions for unknown reasons. Also, the Paris Agreement was signed a lot before everyone’s expectations (which is good) but the problem is that most of the parties are maybe not ready to start with their NDCs.

 

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Daniela Eichelmann's picture
COP22: End of week 1

It is my first time at a COP and it has been surprising, moving, inspiring but most of all overwhelming. There are so many people from so many countries gathered in one same place working over one common interest, fighting Climate Change.
It has taken me by surprise the amount of young people, like myself, that are involved here at COP 22. I am sure that the next international leaders are being forged within this venue.
Although we have not access to most of the negotiation sessions, word is out that parties are ready for next week, when the real happening begins. 

Here is a quick recap of this week’s most important news:

  • Good news: parties seem to be negotiating with a good spirit.
  • Not so good news: Some countries and groups are delaying the negotiation sessions for unknown reasons. Also, the Paris Agreement was signed a lot before everyone’s expectations (which is good) but the problem is that most of the parties are maybe not ready to start with their NDCs.
  • Bad news: Donald Trump was elected President of the United States (he doesn't believe in Climate Change) which means he could try to pull his country out of the Paris Agreement, stop giving money to Climate Funds and even maybe set a precedent so other countries like China to do the same. 
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Santiago Espinosa de los Monteros Harispuru's picture
11/9

9/11, as in September eleven, will forever be a marked date in the calendar of the global human imaginarium, as will, from now on, 11/9, as in November 9. 

 

Today was the third day of COP22, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change that is not easy to drive, has lots of disagreement areas, and lacks the international visibility of its French precessor. We will also see if it misses Laurent Fabius' impressive negotiating skills as its President. Unlike at COP21, delegates at Marrakech have the heavy burden of implementing the ambitious agreements that they hopefully and faithfully reached one year ago in Paris; when implementation was so far away, it was easy to trust our leaders, elected by our societies, to have done the right thing by now. 

 

It seems, though, that our societies have failed. Today, a climate change denier was elected President of the United States, which pretty much means that around 25% of the global emissions will be blind-eyed by the person who can do the most about it. Another slightly frightening issue is that China, responsible for around another quarter of the global emissions, has always approached this deals in an "I go if the US goes" basis. 

 

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Santiago Espinosa de los Monteros Harispuru's picture
Mexican students at COP22!

I have the enormous privilege of leading a group of 35 Mexican students devoted to transitioning the world towards a sustainable energy future. The largest part of what we do is organizing the next International Student Energy Summit, that will be held on June 13-17 2017 (www.studentenergysummit2017.com).

As part of our activities in Mexico City, we approached the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung to look for a global partnership that would allow more and more diverse students to come to our event next year, only to find that we have a complete mutual understanding on why it is so important to tackle the energy challenges that we'll face from a multidisciplinary point of view. 

With them we have come to COP 22 in Marrakech, Morocco. Global meetings, such as COP, are always eye-opening. Only one day has gone by, and I have already come to appreciate the importance of hearing all voices and voicing all concerns when it comes to climate change. 

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Manuela Mattheß's picture
Feeling ''trumped''?

                                                                                                                                         Now what about that? Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States of America. Like the rest of the world, negotiators and observers at COP 22 were caught by quite some surprise this morning when it became clear that Mr. Trump had actually won the 2016 presidential election. On the surface, everything seems to proceed as normal, meetings and workshops as well as official negotiation rounds are being held to ensure that necessary steps on the road to implementing the Paris Agreement will be taken. Beneath the surface, however, the mood has changed. The uncertainty caused by his election takes its toll, leaving many people here with the question what this will mean for international climate policy and on global action to fight disastrous climate change. Like with everything in life, there are two sides of the coin. First of all, the climate community at COP 22 seems not to freak out, which is important. Yes, during the election campaign, Donald Trump has said things that could leave anyone that worries about climate change in tears and fear, but in fact we do not know how he will decide and what he will do in terms of climate action.

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Manuela Mattheß's picture
Just Transition, Baby!

Trade Unions at COP 22 are working hard to make sure that the aspect of a just transition, which is essential to them and their work, remains high on the political agenda. Just Transition as a concept was anchored in the Paris Agreement preamble, therefore making it part of a legally binding agreement. Many parties such as the EU or Canada and also other stakeholder such as the ILO have openly stated their support for the importance of a just transition, especially when it comes to transitioning from a carbon-intensive to low-carbon industries. For the ITUC, however, just transition means much more than just accompanying the transition process for workers. It also includes, for example, the support for social dialogue, social protection and decent work conditions for all people. The concept is not supported by all parties. In a meeting today it became clear that some of them have a problem with it and would rather see it untouched and not talked about anymore. Trade unions need to make sure that they try to influence their government delegations here in Marrakech to advocate for a transition to a sustainable energy future for all. For some delegations, it is an important topic as well, but it tends to fall behind everything else in the negotiation process. Just Transition is a very important concept. If you want an energy transition to be successful and fair, there is absolutely no way around it!

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Manuela Mattheß's picture
COP 22 - Action and Implementation

                                                                                                                                                               The past year has been both a good and an alarming year for the world's climate. On the one side we saw a global committment to facing out of dangerous HFCs and even the international shipping and aviation industries have started to publicly announce that they want to do something about their harmful emissions. Additionally, the Paris Agreement came into force last Friday, as fast as no one would have imagined. On the other side, we saw super hot summer months and extreme weather conditions around the world that can be linked to climate change and have destroyed or threatened the livelihoods of thousands of people. Today COP 22 officially started in Marrakech. The tasks that lay ahead for everybody are huge. The Paris Agreement was a historic success, but now it is time to implement it. And here is where the challenge starts.

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Sachin Kumar's picture
Scaling up green livelihood initiatives-an antidote for climate change induced migration by Sachin Kumar
Environmentally induced disasters have been disrupting livelihood systems of communities significantly, forcing people to move out of their villages. This movement has far-reaching ramifications for the cities where they are going and the villages they are leaving. This issue has been dealt with at two levels, in an obstructive as well as constructive ways. Efforts are being made to ensure proper care of migrants at the place of their arrival which could be considered as one of the constructive ways. At the same time, if we develop resilient communities, provide them with adaptation and mitigation mechanisms and ensure livelihoods at their own places, they would not be forced to leave. These approaches have been bracketed under obstructive ways to deal with migration. It is important to note that both approaches are valuable. BIG GREEN project, supported by FES India can be termed as intermediate-term, obstructive way to deal with environmentally induced migration. We believe that a number of community driven green livelihood initiatives (GLIs) are available throughout the world which is ecologically sustainable, socially equitable and economically viable. But the impact of such GLIs has been limited and they remain small islands of successes. It is important that GLIs are scaled up so that their impact gets maximized and people are not forced to leave their place. It would not only check the influx of people on already
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Shaleindra Bisht's picture
Escaping the Double Whammy of Climate Change - Way forward for Global South´- by Shaleindra Bisht
Developing countries have to engage in a difficult balancing act of generating employment, protecting environment and fulfilling growing aspirations of a young population. This has been exacerbated by the renewed emphasis on tackling climate change on war footing. The global south has thus been burdened by additional charge on their meager resources. The Global South has to account for public opinion when their citizens may believe is that they are not responsible for the 'Climate Change mess'. There might be two ways to go forward´- Top Down led by Global North and Bottom Up led by citizen led but Global South state supported initiatives. Let me first discuss the prevelant model for tackling Global Climate Change where the developed countries provide the technical know-how, execution skill and financial resources. This could then be used by developing world to both mitigate and adapt to climate change. This is certainly faster and might be operationally and financially efficient but runs the risk of being too centralized and thus not responding to ground realities of global south.
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admin's picture
Primeras impresiones de la COP 21

by Gabriela Niño

La segunda semana de las negociaciones de la COP 21 empieza hoy. Los primeros pasos en la COP e impresiones sobre cómo está el ambiente en la sede: La ciudad tranquila, mucha seguridad por las calles, y alrededor de 45 minutos de Montmartre para llegar a la sede. La ciudad respira COP 21 por doquier. El sábado se aprobó el draft para la reunión ministerial con alrededor de mil corchetes, dudas sobre los temas centrales como financiamiento, pérdidas y daños, así como la meta a cumplir entre los 1.5 y los 2 grados centígrados. Las discusiones siguen y es difícil vislumbrar que tanto vamos a avanzar. Hoy por la tarde estará en la plenaria el Ministro de Medio Ambiente de México presentando la posición de México sobre este nuevo acuerdo.

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admin's picture
¿Ambicioso o no el borrador del Acuerdo de París?

by Gabriela Niño and Ana Mendívil

El 5 de diciembre a media noche se aprobó el borrador que el día de hoy, 7 de diciembre de 2015,  se empezará a negociar en las reuniones ministeriales de la COP21. Después de un largo camino y de múltiples reuniones desde  la COP17 en Durban, el sábado se logró tener un borrador para la segunda semana en París. No obstante, quedan muchas preguntas abiertas sobre si éste es lo suficientemente ambicioso o no.

 

Como parte de los compromisos de la Presidencia de la COP, el acuerdo debe estar listo antes de que termine la Conferencia el 11 de diciembre. Entre los pendientes, aún no es posible identificar con claridad cuáles serán los mecanismos a través de los cuales se podrán establecer acciones como el cumplimiento de las INDCs, para cumplir con la meta de que el aumento de la temperatura media global no supere los 2°C. Aunque el texto incluye una meta del 1.5°C, todavía no es posible encontrar en parte de la redacción que este objetivo debe adecuarse a los conocimientos científicos. En este sentido, resulta incomprensible seguir contemplando como horizonte la reducción del 100% de las emisiones entre 2060 y 2080, cuando es hoy el momento en el que deben reducirse por lo menos 70% de las emisiones globales para evitar impactos irreversibles en el medio ambiente y la población mundial.

 

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admin's picture
El día del transporte en la COP21

by Gabriela Niño and Ana Mendívil

En seguimiento al éxito del Día del Transporte celebrado en Lima en el marco de la COP20, las organizaciones Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCat Partnership), Bridiging the Gap Initiative (BtG) y Michelin Challenge Bibendum (MCB) organizaron el Día del Trasporte en el contexto de la COP21 en París, Francia.

 

Así, el domingo 06 de diciembre de 2015 se llevó a cabo en la sede de la International Union of Railway, el Transport Day 2016. Se dieron cita varios expertos de todo el mundo para hablar de sus experiencias acerca de los proyectos más novedosos que se están implementando alrededor del mundo, principalmente en los países en desarrollo. Durante las primeras horas del evento, conferencias en las diversas salas tocaron temas relativos a la reducción de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero (GEI), eficiencia energética, financiamiento, tecnologías y cambios de paradigma sobre la movilidad, el desarrollo urbano y el espacio público.

 

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Luciano Frontelle's picture
COY11 MANIFESTO: A tool for action and lobbying on the fight against Climate Change

youth in 9 different locations, in all continents, and on the web drafting together their recommendations and values for a better world.

By Luciano Frontelle and Giulia Motta Zanin

Just a few days away from the United Nations Conference on Climate Change, COP21, youth from all around the world gathered at the same time in Paris, for COY11, and all the other continents, in Local COYs. Their objective was to draft and publish a Manifesto that may inspire others to act and help those whom are going to be lobbying for a bold and strong agreement  at the end of the negotiations happening for the next two weeks in Le Bourget.

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Pedro Neves's picture
Youngo opens the COP21 with a disturbing but hopeful speach

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Pedro Neves, from France

Since the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change ), in 2005 at COP 5 in Bonn, youth and adolescents have participated in its elaboration, as well as hosting preparatory meetings called "Youth Conferences", which help build and empower these young people to the process of negotiations .

The United Nations set up an organ, with this group of participants, called Youngo (UNFCCC observer constituency of youth non-governmental organizations). In practical terms, it was given to Youngo the responsibility for directing plenaries, discussing high-level segments of the COP/CMP, making individual and collective requests, holding training workshops, finding Convention officers, and also occupying seats in the discussions, also promoting the Youth Day for future generations about the COPs.

On the first day of the event in Paris, Youngo published their first statement and released a document saying the expectations for the agreements that define COP21. "Breathe deeply. This will be the last time that any living being will witness the CO2 levels below 400ppm. After long years sleeping, from 1992 to 2015, it's time to wake up", said Juan Jose Vazquez Milling, representative of Youngo, in his opening speech at COP21.

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Inti Rioja Guzmán's picture
¿Es posible que una economía decrezca?

mach_1.jpg

Inti Tonatiuh Rioja Guzmán * resumen campamento de Decrecimiento y Cambio Climático en Erkelenz - Alemania.

 

Pese al crecimiento de nuevos países en la economía mundial como China, la hegemonía del norte contemplada como Europa occidental y Estados Unidos se encuentra vigente, el modelo que plantea medir el crecimiento a partir del Producto Interno Bruto (PIB) es un ejemplo.

 

El modelo impulsa a que las economías se vean en una constante carrera de expansión, es una teoría de connotaciones fuertes e involucra los paradigmas civilizatorios de gobierno y sociedad civil.

 

El crecimiento juega un rol importante en las sociedades capitalistas, puede mantener a poblaciones políticamente estables al costo de moverse constantemente para no caer, a su vez, el expandirse y reproducirse genera individualización de las personas llevando al medio ambiente a un límite.

 

Es compleja la realidad, principalmente porque vemos una evolución del colonialismo antes impuesto de persona a persona, ahora, de modelo económico a persona, todo esto a raíz de la necesidad de “crear” un sujeto que pueda ser explotado globalmente, una especie de racismo ambiental.

 

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Shakir Majeedi's picture
Degrowth by example

Degrowth means living lightly on earth, says Dr. Al-Jayyousi from Jordan to a tent of fully packed enthusiasts who want to listen to his lecture about “Islam and Sustainable Development”. The summer camp that attracted more than a thousand activists from around Germany and other countries such as Afghanistan, Jordan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe, Madagascar, and Canada, the latter supported by the FES.

Their slogan ‘Degrowth’, which is still not recognizable by my computer dictionary, was not mere words but a collective strive to show it in action during the 10-day camp from August 7 to 17 in the Rhineland. A platform, in order to exchange knowledge and experience amongst the developing and developed nations about climate justice and how the industrialization has negatively affected the environment, the society, displaced entire communities, and has caused misfortune to the same human beings it is supposed to help.

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Odeh Al-Jayyousi's picture
Re-thinking de-growth: Islamic perspectives

Islam as a way of life is seen to provide remedies and insights to the national and global debate on growth and sustainability. Islam views the role of the individual as a value-and knowledge creator, a steward, witness, and a reformer who strives to contribute to progress and good life (Hayat Tayebah). To be able to achieve this, we must develop new development models that are informed by both culture and ecology. Social equity, good governance, participation, de-growth, conservation and protection are key principles in natural resources  management in Islam. Islamic development model argues for achieving prosperity without increasing the ecological footprints. Paradoxically, the wealth in the Gulf countries in the Middle East generated from oil in the early of the 20th century was coupled with a modernization model that acclerated overconsuption and waste production. 

 

To be a Muslim implies that one has to believe in all prophets including Abraham, Moses and Jusus since all are one continuum. The “unity” (or Tawhid in Arabic) means a unified mission of humanity to protect the Earth or construction of the Earth (Emartu Al ard). The process of construction (or re-construction) entails a set of shifts in the following domains:

 

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